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Fun Fact Friday: Happy as a Clam at High Tide

​Ever wonder what “happy as a clam” meant?  Me either.  But I found the meaning and I’m sharing it just incase you did ever wonder.  Because that’s what I do.  I answer questions that no one asks.  😉

The full expression is “Happy as a clam at high tide.” At high tide, they’re safely covered in water.  They are blissful, or the closest clams can be to happiness, I would imagine.  But at low tide, people (& critters I would suppose) go clam digging.  Then they are no longer happy & blissful clams.   
Consider your unasked question answered.  😚

Point to ponder while you wander…Joy of the Lord is strength. Joy keeps you strong even when you aren’t situationally  happy as a clam. 

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Fun Fact Friday: Be a Maverick

The term “maverick” means original, nonconformist, eccentric, an individualist. But it can also mean an unbranded calf or yearling. But why? Where did these meaning originate? 

Well…These definitions come from an actual Maverick. No really. His name is Samuel Maverick.

Sam Maverick was a cattle rancher (also a politician and a lawyer) in Texas in the 1800’s who refused to brand his cattle. He said that branding cattle was cruel, so he didnt do it.

His rivals said that he didn’t brand his cattle so he could claim any cow found without a brand. But the truth is more likely to be that nearby ranchers were branding unmarked “mavericks” with their own brand, since Mr. Maverick was closely involved in interests outside of raising cattle. 

Point to ponder while you wander… God created you to be you. Not to be a robot or a carbon copy of those around you. Jesus likes mavericks. ⏬ See Romans 12:2.

Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is–his good, pleasing and perfect will.” Romans 12:2 NIV

A Bowl of Cherries

“Life is just a bowl of cherries.”

I’ve never understood why this quip is used in sarcasm or as a way of saying life is unpleasant without sounding like a whiner. It’s more like they’re saying life is a bowl of cherry pits.

I think the people who started this bad reputation for the cherries needed a perspective shift. 

Maybe they chose cherries because they didn’t like that cherries have pits. Maybe they couldn’t afford to buy cherries. Maybe people say it because you can only get good Michigan cherries once a year.

Whatever the reason, cherries don’t deserve that woe is me reputation. I mean just look at how joyful they look? And yummy! Mmm.

Point to ponder while you wander…The Word says…as a man thinks so is he. Meaning how you see the world will determine who you become in the world.

Perspective matters. 

Are you choosing to focus on the pits and stems (negative aspects of life) or are you choosing to enjoy the cherries (the small little sweet things that happen every day)?


Light of the World 

​”As long as I am in the world,  I am the light of the world.” John 9:5 

When Jesus took His place at the right hand of God, you took His place as the light of the world. 

Point to ponder while you wander…. Shine on light of the world!

This little light of mine…I’m gonna let it shine. This little light of mine…I’m gonna let it shine. Let it shine. Let it shine. Let it shine.

Let There Be Water

Then God said, “Let there be a space between the waters, to separate the waters of the heavens from the waters of the earth.” – Genesis 1:6

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Point to ponder while you wander…God’s an artist. There’s beauty in everything He made. Especially you.

30 Years Later

Mackinac Bridge in Winter.  Photo from Mackinac Bridge Authority's Webcam

Mackinac Bridge in Winter. Photo from Mackinac Bridge Authority’s Webcam.

About 30 years ago, on a blustery, snow-filled winter’s  night, I crossed the Mighty Mac for the first time. Mom was driving; white-knuckling it actually because of the poor visibility and wind gusts.

My five year old inquisitor brother starts grilling with questions, “Whoa, Mom, how deep is that water down there? How far up are we? Is the water cold? Would we…”

My Mom never answered his questions or found the answers for him, as she usually did…due to her intense fear at that moment.

This past Labor Day, half of our family walked the Mighty Mac during the annual Labor Day bridge walk, including the now 35 year old inquisitor. While we were enjoying Mackinac City, Mom finds a paper with Mackinac Bridge fun facts. She smiled and said, “Jeff, I have the answers to your questions. The water under the bridge is  95 feet deep and the bridge is 199 feet above the water.”

We were all laughed, heartily!

But there’s a lesson here too. Sometimes people cannot answer your personal questions. Usually it’s because they don’t know or don’t want to appear foolish or that the truth might embarrass them.

But sometimes it’s because they are flat out terrified. Fear prevents people from being honest with themselves and with you. Fear is the enemy of intimacy and vulnerability. Fear corners people and causes them to behave oh so squirrelly…or mean…or rude.

My mom always tried to help us get answers to our questions, but her fear caused her to be short with my brother & tell him to just shut up.

I’m not sure what point I’m trying to make…other than I love my family and I loathe fear…but this has just been rolling around in my head and I needed to get it out.

PS Random funny..me, my mom and my niece all prefer walking the Mighty Mac to driving over it. We feel safer. Weird but true.

 

 

Fun-Fact Friday

My Nana says my Mom was a tow-head. My Mom says my sister was a tow-head. And now my sister calls my adorable niece a tow-head.

We all know tow-head means a kiddo with light blonde hair, but have you ever wondered where does that expression come from?

Yeah, me too!

Well I discovered two options.

1. Tow comes from an old German word touw. Touw means flax or hemp fiber. The color of flax is very close to blonde, hence tow-head.

2. Back in the day, families grew their own flax to make their own clothing and ropes. The process of turning flax into thread was a tedious process. But since they were without malls and on-line  shopping in Colonial days, what option did they have?

The flax would be harvested, and soaked in water for several days to soften it. Then the inner fibers would need to be removed from the stalk. (Whomever figured out how to make clothes from plants is seriously brilliant.) The flax would be pulled through a bed of nails or combed in a process called towing. The short fibers that were removed were called tow. People who had hair that resembled this tow were called tow-heads.

I think a brother started it, intending to insult his little sister, but eventually it became an endearing way to describe adorable little curly heades, blondies like my niece.

In case you are one of those truly curious people, here’s why most tow-heads end up with dark hair.